Grants

"New technology is improving diabetes care. Our goal is to make this valuable tool more accessible to inner-city residents who are unaware of it and are struggling to control blood sugars. Receiving real time data and reviewing reports along with diabetes education will teach them to better react." - Diane Battaglia, RN, CDE of the UPMC Mercy Diabetes Center

IMPACT OF ACCESS TO DIABETES TECHNOLOGY ON GLYCEMIC VARIATIONS IN AN URBAN POPULATION OF PEOPLE WITH TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 DIABETES

Grant Application

Diane Battaglia, RN, CDE, of the UPMC Mercy Diabetes CenterC

 

Proposed Innovation

Glucose monitoring is essential for managing diabetes and preventing serious complications. Since glucose levels can fluctuate minute to minute, finger-prick blood monitoring may not provide an accurate picture of glucose levels over time. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology is a painless new technology worn by the patient that continuously samples glucose levels throughout the day. Despite its effectiveness, however, the technology is not readily available to underserved, inner city patients.

Through this project, high-risk urban residents identified with uncontrolled diabetes will be offered the new technology. They will also be given the opportunity to meet with specialists to learn how to interpret the data to improve diabetes management.

 

Improvements in Action

A team consisting of a certified diabetes nurse educator and endocrinologist will be created to identify and work with high-risk patients. These patients will be taught how to use the CGM and interpret the data. Patients also will learn how to use the data to identify the cause of erratic glucose readings.

 

Results — In Progress

This project will decrease health disparities by providing underserved residents access to new CGM technology. Providing continuous, real-time information will enable high-risk patients to learn how to interpret the data, recognize trends, and make better decisions about insulin and food.